Sunday, April 04, 2010

Resurrection Sunday Thoughts


As this is Resurrection Sunday, I'm going to post a brief reflection instead of the planned "The Fundamentals" post. That series will resume next weekend.

When I think about the events of Passion Week, I can't help but wonder if any of us really get it. And I'm talking about believers, even people like me who have been believers for years. The very thought that the Creator of the universe humbled Himself, became a man, allowed His own creation to abuse and kill Him, died on the cross for my sins, and then rose again from the dead for my justification. It really passes human understanding.

And what a challenge to really understand grace and mercy. When I look at my own life, I realize that I am so, so far from what the Lord would want me to be in character. It's not really necessary to write a list of my own shortcomings, but let me assure you, they are voluminous. And would I be any different if I had been alive at the time of Jesus' crucifixion and had witnessed it first hand? Of course, there's a change that comes at the moment you are converted. But you still struggle with sin.

We tend to put the Apostles on a pedestal, but they were still human. Paul had to correct Peter when Peter compromised the Gospel, and Paul continued to refer to himself as the chief of sinners. But they, more than anyone else, had to have come he closest to really knowing what God's grace and mercy means. They understood the enormity of it.

Why don't more people believe? It can't be merely because they can't see it or didn't see it happen. If you remember Jesus' parable about the rich man and Lazarus, even if they saw Lazarus rise from the dead, they still wouldn't have believed. The children of Israel saw the Lord directly do all sorts of things, but it didn't stop their unbelief and rebellion.

But somehow, miraculously, God is saving a people for Himself. He bought and paid for us with a price. And His blood cleanses us from all unrighteousness. He will complete the work He began in us.

Thank you, Lord, seems so inadequate. But say it I must.

Thank you, Lord.

1 comment:

Caleb Kolstad said...

He is risen!